Mid-Shore Lyme Disease Association, Inc.
Articles

Sarah A. Hamer, Graham J. Hickling, Jennifer L. Sidge, Michelle E. Rosen, Edward D. Walker, and Jean I. Tsao

Applied and Environmental Microbiology, published online ahead of print: 21 January 2011.

Abstract
The blacklegged tick Ixodes scapularis is the primary vector of the most prevalent vector-borne zoonosis in North America, Lyme disease (LD). Enzootic maintenance of the pathogen Borrelia burgdorferi by I. scapularis and small mammals is well-documented, whereas its ‘cryptic’ maintenance by other specialist ticks and wildlife hosts remains largely unexplored because these ticks rarely bite humans….

Sarah A. Hamer, Graham J. Hickling, Jennifer L. Sidge, Michelle E. Rosen, Edward D. Walker, and Jean I. Tsao

Applied and Environmental Microbiology, published online ahead of print: 21 January 2011.

Abstract

The blacklegged tick Ixodes scapularis is the primary vestor of the most prevalent vector-borne zoonosis in North America, Lyme disease (LD).  Enzootic maintenance of the pathogen Borrelia burgdorferi by I. scapularis and small mammals is well-documented, whereas its ‘cryptic’ maintenance by other specialist ticks and wildlife hosts remains largely unexplored because these ticks rarely bite humans….

  • LYMEPOLICYWONK: Ringing out the old year: Stricker & Johnson Publications 2010

http://www.lymedisease.org/news/lymepolicywonk/632.html

20 January, 2011

Abstract

During 2010, Dr. Stricker and I published nine articles or letters on Lyme disease. Shortly after the New Year, another publication by us came out. This post lists these 10 publications and tells you how to access those that are available without charge. . . .

In 2000, the World Health Organization (WHO) reported that over a billion people are at risk for parasitic worm infections (filaria).  120 million people are infected with parasites in more than 80 countries (Africa, Asia, Central and South Americas, and the Pacific Islands). Of those infected, 44 million suffer filariasis symptoms….

  • Med Vet Entomol. 2010 Dec;24(4):425-32. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2915.2010.00905.x. Epub 2010 Sep 26.

 

Appl Environ Microbiol. 2010 Oct 22; [Epub ahead of print]
Genotypic diversity of Borrelia burgdorferi detected in Ixodes scapularis larvae collected from North American songbirds.
Brinkerhoff RJ, Bent SJ, Folsom-O'Keefe CM, Tsao K, Hoen AG, Barbour AG, Diuk-Wasser MA.

Yale School of Public Health, Box 208034, 60 College St. New Haven, CT 06520-8034; Departments of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics and Medicine, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697.

Abstract
We genotyped Borrelia burgdorferi detected in larvae of Ixodes scapularis removed from songbirds and compared them with those found in host-seeking I. scapularis nymphs sampled throughout the eastern U.S. Birds are capable of transmitting most known genotypes, albeit at different frequencies than expected based on genotypes found among host-seeking nymphs.

PMID: 20971869 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] Infect Immun. 2010 Oct 25; [Epub ahead of print]
 
Lipoproteins of bacterial pathogens.
 
Kovacs-Simon A, Titball RW, Michell SL.
 
School of Biosciences, University of Exeter, Devon, UK.

Abstract
Bacterial lipoproteins are a set of membrane proteins with many different functions. Due to this broad-ranging functionality these proteins have a considerable significance on many phenomenon from cellular physiology through to cell division and virulence……

Abstract
Bacterial lipoproteins are a set of membrane proteins with many different functions. Due to this broad-ranging functionality these proteins have a considerable significance on many phenomenon from cellular physiology through to cell division and virulence….

 

Abstract
Bacterial lipoproteins are a set of membrane proteins with many different functions. Due to this broad-ranging functionality these proteins have a considerable significance on many phenomenon from cellular physiology through to cell division and virulence……

PMID: 20974828 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Vet Microbiol. 2010 Oct 21; [Epub ahead of print]
 

Abstract

Host-dependent differential expression of factor H binding proteins, their affinity to factor H and complement evasion by Lyme and relapsing fever borreliae.
 
Kisova-Vargova L, Mucha R, Cernanska D, Bhide M.
 
Laboratory of Biomedical Microbiology and Immunology, University of Veterinary Medicine and pharmacy, Kosice, Slovakia.
 
Binding of complement factor H is crucial for the resistance of Borrelia to complement-mediated lysis. This study was aimed to assess the correlation between the expression of fH binding proteins (FHBPs) during the early phase of infection (48h after the entry of Borrelia into the blood circulation) and complement resistance of the Borrelia genus….

  • PMID: 20974828 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
    Vet Microbiol. 2010 Oct 21; [Epub ahead of print]
     

Abstract

Host-dependent differential expression of factor H binding proteins, their affinity to factor H and complement evasion by Lyme and relapsing fever borreliae.
 
Kisova-Vargova L, Mucha R, Cernanska D, Bhide M.
 
Laboratory of Biomedical Microbiology and Immunology, University of Veterinary Medicine and pharmacy, Kosice, Slovakia.
 
Binding of complement factor H is crucial for the resistance of Borrelia to complement-mediated lysis. This study was aimed to assess the correlation between the expression of fH binding proteins (FHBPs) during the early phase of infection (48h after the entry of Borrelia into the blood circulation) and complement resistance of the Borrelia genus…..

PMID: 20970929 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry. 2010 Nov;81(11):e41.
 
POC26 A protracted course of neuroborelliosis, the debate continues.
 
Huda S, Afzal MF, Tyne H, Wieshmann UC.
 
shuda@nhs.net.
 
Abstract

A 58-year-old lady who had waxing and waning nonspecific symptoms including fatigue and unsteadiness for 15 months became acutely confused prior to presentation. Her travel history prior to presentation consisted of visits to Argentina, Chile and the Outer Hebrides….

PMID: 20972087 [PubMed - in process]
 
PLoS One. 2010 Oct 20;5(10):e13519.
 
Complement factor H-related proteins CFHR2 and CFHR5 represent novel ligands for the infection-associated CRASP proteins of Borrelia burgdorferi.
 
Siegel C, Hallstrom T, Skerka C, Eberhardt H, Uzonyi B, Beckhaus T, Karas M, Wallich R, Stevenson B, Zipfel PF, Kraiczy P.
 
Institute of Medical Microbiology and Infection Control, University Hospital of Frankfurt, Frankfurt/Main, Germany.

Abstract
BACKGROUND: One virulence property of Borrelia burgdorferi is its resistance to innate immunity, in particular to complement-mediated killing. Serum-resistant B. burgdorferi express up to five distinct complement regulator-acquiring surface proteins (CRASP) which interact with complement regulator factor H (CFH) and factor H-like protein 1 (FHL1) or factor H-related protein 1 (CFHR1). In the present study we elucidate the role of the infection-associated CRASP-3 and CRASP-5 protein to serve as ligands for additional complement regulatory proteins as well as for complement resistance of B. burgdorferi.
Publication Types:
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

PMID: 20975954 [PubMed - in process]
Travel Med Infect Dis. 2010 Sep;8(5):277-84. Epub 2010 Sep 9.
 
Looking the other way: preventing vector-borne disease among travelers to the
United States.
 
Hayes EB.
 
Barcelona Centre for International Health Research, Rosello 132, 08036
Barcelona, Spain. ned.hayes@cresib.cat
 

Abstract
Millions of travelers visit the
United States every year during warm months when risk of vector-borne disease is highest. The epidemiology and geographic distribution of the principal vector-borne diseases in the United States are reviewed and recommendations for visitors to reduce their risk of disease are described….

PMID: 20873460 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

The National underinsured Patient Directory is a patient advocate organization, and while they do not have the capability to help adults, they take every Pediatric case with LD. They provide arbitration, mediation, and negotiation to settle issues involving access to care, medical debt and many other areas, including education.

A bit off topic, but you might find the documents/history interesting.

 In the "early" days of Lyme, patients had little to no hope when they failed the CDC's protocol for Lyme treatment.  Originally no antibiotics were prescribed because Lyme was said to be caused by a virus (Steere publication).  Then a week of antibiotics was initially prescribed (usually penicillin).  Then- because some docs found more or repeated antibiotics often worked (some who are now some of our top LLMD's), the protocol was eventually upped to what Dattwyler referred to as an "arbitrary" number of days for treatment duration- two to three weeks (they came around after being dragged like a mule to do so, but kicked and screamed the whole time).  Anyhow...

 A number of people hoped after hearing of Dr. Heimlich's work, that contracting Malaria might cause a fever high enough to cure the Lyme or at least improve the patient's condition, since it worked in many cases of neuro-syphilis in the past.  Many of us had no other options (denied any further treatment) and we begged to have something to try that might prevent further brain and other organ system damage.

 As someone who actually went out and purchased a passport because I was planning to make the trip to Mexico for the experimental Malaria treatment, I found this information below (long after the fact) to be quite interesting.  I was scheduled to leave 2 days after the first report came back from the original small group that went to Mexico for the therapy.  From what I remember, one person didn't contract Malaria, one did and got very ill- but relapsed with Lyme, and one did get better.  I decided at that point against making the trip (or actually my mother and grandmother decided for me because my mother had Malaria as a child and nearly died from it).

Interesting to note how hard Dr. Heimlich worked to try to convince the CDC to help HIV and Lyme patients.  They seemed to have lied to him at worst... and strung him along at the least.

Correspondence: U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC), Dr. Heimlich, and Induced Malaria Therapy (IMT) for Lyme Disease

               FOIA documents dealing with CDC, Dr. Heimlich, Tuskegee
                           
Malaria Therapy for Lyme,
Hopkins, etc. 

 

  • http://www.fairfaxtimes.com/cms/story.php?id=1021

    Tuesday February 2, 2010

    Student's research paper
    on Lyme disease ranks nationally

    Thomas Jefferson High senior a finalist
    in annual Intel Science Talent Search

    by Holly Hobbs | Staff Writer

    A high school senior's research paper on Lyme disease is getting national recognition for proposing a method of early detection that cuts diagnosis time from a month to mere minutes.

    "We're going to develop a new diagnostic test so that we can detect it earlier and more accurately," said
    Temple Douglas, 18, of Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology in Alexandria.

    Douglas was recently named one of 40 finalists nationwide in the Intel Science Talent Search, an annual contest sponsored by Intel Corporation that scouts for research conducted by high school seniors in the fields of science, health and technology.

    She received a $5,000 scholarship for the ranking, a laptop and a chance to compete in March for a $100,000 scholarship in
    Washington, D.C.

    Douglas said her research was inspired by three family members' struggles with Lyme disease.

    "My sister and brother had joint pain, but my mom had more severe symptoms," she said. Almost half of the cases of Lyme disease in
    Virginia are reported in Loudoun County, where Douglas lives. A resident of Lucketts, she buses 90 minutes to her Fairfax County school each day.

    Students at Thomas Jefferson are required to do a senior research paper.
    Douglas chose Lyme disease as the subject of hers.

    "At the end of the summer, I was thinking of the testing and its inaccuracies and what could be improved," she said. Currently, blood tests are used to detect Lyme disease.

    "Now, you have to wait for antibodies to show up [in your blood]. That can take up to three weeks,"
    Douglas said. Her research paper, "The Application of Hydrogel Nanoparticles for Early Lyme Disease Diagnosis," proposes using a urine test instead.

    "Nanoparticles are added to the urine to allow you to see the bacteria," she said.

    Staff and teachers at Thomas Jefferson said they are not surprised by
    Douglas's successful ranking.

    "As a student,
    Temple was very inquisitive and enthusiastic," said teacher Robert Latham, the school's science and engineering fair coordinator. "The choice of what to do after high school or college rests with Temple, but from the experience gained in her scientific project work and from the maturity developed in writing a scholarly scientific research paper, she has demonstrated high-level skills that would make her very successful as a research scientist or in a related field.

    "I would like to see her win a Nobel Prize."

    Douglas has already been accepted to several colleges, including Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

    Principal Evan Glazer had similar praise for
    Douglas, saying, "Her work is inspiring because she pursued groundbreaking work in a topic that could help her family."

    Twelve of
    Douglas's fellow students were named semi-finalists in the contest earlier this month, each receiving a $1,000 prize for themselves and $1,000 for their school.

    Last year, two
    Jefferson High School students ranked as finalists in the Intel competition, Alexander Kim and Narendra Tallapragada.

    Of the D.C. conference in March,
    Douglas said she is excited and nervous to compete, adding that she would find it "neat" to meet President Obama.

    "The kids last year got to meet Obama," she said.

    Douglas said she hopes to one day assist in the efforts to find a cure for cancer.

    Copyright © 2010 Post-Newsweek Media, Inc./FairfaxTimes.com
    _

_._,_.___

  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4ALgOikmjCw - Like*YOU CAN'T FEEL TICKS CRAWL*THEY NUMB BEFORE BITING*THEY FOLLOW YOUR BREATH (C02) AND TRACK YOU DOWN*DEER TICKS LOVE ALL ANIMALS*LYME IS A DANGEROUS, VIRULENT SPIROCHETE*INSURANCE DOESN'T COVER 00:09:23

 

  • Coming this spring and available at select book stores and online at Borders.com and amazon.com, The Lyme Conspiracy. If you enjoyed, Ticket to Paradise & The last Season, you should read this thriller.

What if a single strain of bacteria were responsible for over three hundred diseases affecting Americans today including: Multiple Sclerosis, Fibromyalgia, Lou Gehrig’s disease, Alzheimer’s, and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome? And what if the federal government is responsible for the outbreak of these bacteria?

 Ben is the perfect assassin. A former Navy SEAL with several combat kills, Ben was recruited out of the military by the CIA for one reason; to terminate any potential threats to the federal government.  His new mission is to eliminate a series of threats that are attempting to expose top secret biological warfare experiments that were conducted at the Plum Island Infectious Disease Center in Long Island New York. Connecticut State Police Detective Taylor Marshall is contending with an all boys club at work. When she is assigned a homicide case involving a retired government scientist that worked on Plum Island, she is determined to solve the case to prove herself to her peers, while finding justice for the victim. After a second former Plum Island scientist is killed in Long Island, Taylor is convinced a killer targeted these old friends in order to keep a sinister government secret from being exposed. As the investigation blossoms, Taylor and investigative reporter, Gary Mitchell, join together in a race to find the truth about what happened on Plum Island and who is committing murder to cover it up. When Gary is nearly killed in a hit and run, Taylor realizes they too have become targets.  Determined to find the killer, Taylor knows she must outsmart a ruthless assassin in order to neutralize him before he gets to her.

 

PMID: 20972087 [PubMed - in process]
 
PLoS One. 2010 Oct 20;5(10):e13519.
 
Complement factor H-related proteins CFHR2 and CFHR5 represent novel ligands for the infection-associated CRASP proteins of Borrelia burgdorferi.
 
Siegel C, Hallstrom T, Skerka C, Eberhardt H, Uzonyi B, Beckhaus T, Karas M, Wallich R, Stevenson B, Zipfel PF, Kraiczy P.
 
Institute of Medical Microbiology and Infection Control, University Hospital of Frankfurt, Frankfurt/Main, Germany.

 

 

PMID: 20975954 [PubMed - in process]
Travel Med Infect Dis. 2010 Sep;8(5):277-84. Epub 2010 Sep 9.
 
Looking the other way: preventing vector-borne disease among travelers to the
United States.
 
Hayes EB.
 
Barcelona Centre for International Health Research, Rosello 132, 08036
Barcelona, Spain. ned.hayes@cresib.cat
 

Abstract
Millions of travelers visit the
United States every year during warm months when risk of vector-borne disease is highest. The epidemiology and geographic distribution of the principal vector-borne diseases in the United States are reviewed and recommendations for visitors to reduce their risk of disease are described….

Website Builder